Trademark news

Published promotional video lethal to Community Design Petsbelle scratching post

Petsbelle designs, produces and markets scratching posts. In order to protect the design of its products, the company applies for European design protection. There are two important requirements for a European design registration. A model must be novel and have its own character. Novelty is often a problem. Many companies first want to test the waters before incurring the costs to claim their rights. In the European Union it is therefore possible to claim design rights up to twelve months after first disclosure. However this grace term is hard. » design-law

Brexit update - transition period until 31 December 2020

After a rather ominous period of silence, last January 24th the European Union and the UK placed the necessary signatures in order for England to formally leave the EU on January 31th. It is important to note that a transition period has been agreed upon which, which will last until the end of 2020. Until that date all existing EU rights will continue to apply in the UK. So for the moment nothing will change for holders of EU trademarks and designs. Also English representatives will remain authorized to act before the EUIPO and EU courts, at least until that date. » trademarks

Ban on wave shaped shoe display

Copyright does not only apply to Art with a capital “A”. Products of applied art are also often seen as a creation. If this is the case, then a work is protected by copyright and slavishly copying it is not really sensible. » copyright

Ion Maiden becomes Ion Fury

When choosing a title for an online game it is wise to check whether this name can be used freely. 3D Realms, developers of Duke Nukem, learned this when it announced the name of its new game Ion Maiden. British heavy metal band Iron Maiden has registered its name (and logo) in many countries (including the US) to prevent coat-tail riding. » trademarks

Fack Ju Göthe – Public policy and accepted principles of morality

When examining a new trademark application, the authorities also assess whether the trademark may be in breach of public policy and the accepted principles of morality. The Benelux authorities are very liberal on this point. The European authorities are a lot stricter. Many applications are refused, relating to drugs, politics, religion and sex. As soon as the F-word is in it, you can assume that the trademark will be refused. But is this just? Should a trademark actually be refused on this ground? » trademark-registration
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PURE - MENTOS

MENTOS has been selling chewing gum under the name MENTOS PURE FRESH for several years. In order to protect her rights MENTOS has registered the following trademarks: the logo MENTOS PURE FRESH, the logo MENTOS PURE FRESH 3 and a figurative depiction of the word PURE. Defendant sells chewing gum under the trademark DENTYNE PURE and has registered its logo as a trademark. Infringement or not?
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